What is a Left and Right Hand Toilet?

Accessible Toilet Signage must include legible writing with Braille, and identify whether the toilet is a Left Hand Toilet or a Right Hand Toilet. The concept of a LH and RH toilet is to show wheelchair users which way to transfer on to the toilet. This matter is often confused on building sites with incorrect signage often being applied. Other important compliance requirements include: the actual size of the room, clear door opening width, circulation space between the toilet and the basin and shower etc, provision of a backrest or compliant cistern with built in backrest to the toilet, shower seat, grab rails, unobstructed facilities e.g. hand basin with chair/leg room beneath, toggle switches for power points and switches, location of a mirror, soap dispensers and toilet paper holders located to specified heights and locations. Access from outside the building to the accessible toilet is also mandatory and includes accessible car parking, minimum width passage ways, ramps, tactile indicators and handrails, visual contrasting doors & architraves for the visually impaired. Requirements can vary for different building classifications/uses e.g. pre-school versus commercial office premises, retail shopping centre etc.
Australian Standards such as AS1428.1, 1428.4 and AS2890.6 set out the specific requirements for most of these items and other specialists such as Access consultants and Accredited Building Certifiers play an important role to ensure compliance is achieved.

Image showing Left Hand Toilet and Right Hand Toilet. Image Source http://timthesignman.com.au/lh-rh_handing/

Image showing Left Hand Toilet and Right Hand Toilet.
Image Source http://timthesignman.com.au/lh-rh_handing/